Lecture on Disease & Therapy in the Eastern Mediterranean by Prof. Eleni Mantzourani – Monday March 2, 6.16pm

Dear All,

You are cordially invited to an event sponsored by the Onassis Foundation and the Columbia Center for Archaeology.

Dr. Eleni Mantzourani
Professor of Prehistoric Archaeology, Faculty of History and Archaeology, University of Athens

Disease and Therapy: medical and other therapeutical practices in the prehistoric eastern Mediterranean

The lecture will address the issue of health as well as the medical and other therapeutic practices in the eastern Mediterranean during the 3rd and 2nd millennia BCE. The study of skeletal remains, archaeological finds, and textual evidence are the main sources on health conditions in prehistoric times. Three key-areas will be examined: Egypt, Mesopotamia, and the Aegean. Although we can reconstruct the most detailed picture on health and diseases in Egypt, important insights can be gained for the Near East and the Aegean worlds as well. The information available on the treatment of wounds and other external injuries (primarily of legs, feet, arms, and the head) suggests a sophisticated knowledge of orthopedics and surgery. There is also evidence for the existence of infectious diseases caused by viruses and/or bacteria. Diseases, injuries, and their more or less medical treatment played an important role in life and death of prehistoric eastern Mediterranean populaces. Among other things, the lecture will place healing and medicine in close proximity to ‘magical’ and further religious practices.

Monday, March 26.15pm
612 Schermerhorn Ext.

ALL WELCOME

Seminar by Dr. Ylva Sjöstrand (Uppsala University)

Dr. Ylva Sjöstrand (Uppsala Uniiversity, Sweden) – “Exposing ontological multiplicity: towards a revitalized concept of art in archaeological research”

Friday February 20th, 5pm, 951 Schermerhorn Ext., Columbia University.

Ylva will be discussing her ideas on art theory and rock art in the context of Neolithic Sweden. Her paper for discussion is attached.

ALL WELCOME

For more Center for Archaeology events this semester, see:

http://www.columbia.edu/cu/archaeology/

GS Senior Thesis Stipend available — Spring term deadline March 1, 2015

Dear Colleagues:

As you know, GS offers stipends for our seniors who are working on thesis projects.

If you have GS seniors in your department or program who have just begun thesis research in the Spring term, please encourage them to complete the GS Senior Thesis Stipend Application that I have attached to this email.

Students may also download the form  here.  The application is due in 612 Lewisohn by March 1, 2015.  Stipends are limited to $250.

If you have any questions about this stipend or the application, please do not hesitate to contact me.

Thank you for your continued support of our students.

All the best,

Glenn Novarr

Assistant Dean for Academic and Veteran Affairs

School of General Studies

612 Lewisohn Hall, Mail Code 4103

2970 Broadway

New York, NY  10027

(212) 854-3672

Info Session – Columbia Summer Program: Hadrian’s Villa, The Archaeology of an Imperial Court

Info Session – Columbia Summer Program: Hadrian’s Villa, The Archaeology of an Imperial Court

Columbia’s Advanced Program of Ancient History and Art (APAHA) offers a four-week summer program that provides undergraduate and graduate students with the unique opportunity to excavate and learn together at Hadrian’s Villa, a UNESCO World Heritage site near Rome and the most important of Roman imperial villas. Students will learn archaeological techniques at all levels and think critically about how excavation work allows for deeper insight into the social, political, economic, architectural and artistic history of classical antiquity. Partial and full scholarships are available.  Come to the information session to learn more from the Faculty Directors and past participants!

Date: Tuesday, February 17th
Time: 5:30-6:30 p.m.
Place: 612 Schermerhorn

Interested but can’t attend? Visit: http://columbia.studioabroad.com/?go=HadriansVilla

APAHA is a program created under the joint aegis of Columbia’s Italian Academy for Advanced Studies in America and H2CU, the Honors Center of Italian Universities of the Sapienza University in Rome. It is promoted by the Department of Art History and Archaeology, the Department of History, and the Classical Studies Graduate Program. It is directed by Professor Francesco de Angelis (Art History and Archaeology) and Professor Marco Maiuro (History)

Ghosts of the Past: Nazi-Looted Art and Its Legacies

Thursday, February 19, 2015 – Saturday, February 21, 2015 

The Jewish Museum and 501 Schermerhorn Hall, Columbia University

An International Conference co-organized by Columbia University’s Department of Art History and Archaeology & Deutsches Haus in collaboration with the Goethe-Institut, New York, and the Jewish Museum, New York. Cosponsored with Columbia University’s Middle East Institute, the History Department, and the University Seminar on Cultural Memory. Funding provided by Columbia University’s Institute of Israel and Jewish Studies, the Samuel H. Kress Foundation, the Deutscher Akademischer Austauschdienst (DAAD), and New German Critique

“Ghosts of the Past: Nazi-Looted Art and Its Legacies” convenes an international group of art historians, historians, curators, and scholars in provenance research and the history of German art dealership to explore an unexamined chapter of the legacies of the Third Reich.

This conference, to be held at Columbia on February 20 and 21, 2015, opens with a keynote lecture at the Jewish Museum by Olaf Peters, Professor, Martin Luther Universität Halle-Wittenberg, and curator of the recent exhibition “Degenerate Art” at the Neue Galerie, New York.

Admission is free for registered participants.

Conference Registration required at link.

Locations:

February 19, 6:30pm- 8:00pm: Olaf Peters, Keynote Speech, The Jewish Museum

February 20: 9:00am-1:00pm, 501 Schermerhorn Hall, Columbia University

February 21: 9:00am-6:00pm, 501 Schermerhorn Hall, Columbia University

Information Session – Columbia Summer Program: Archaeological Fieldwork at Hadrian’s Villa

Columbia’s Advanced Program of Ancient History and Art (APAHA) offers a four-week summer program that provides undergraduate and graduate students with the unique opportunity to excavate and learn together at Hadrian’s Villa, a UNESCO World Heritage site near Rome and the most important of Roman imperial villas. Students will learn archaeological techniques at all levels and think critically about how excavation work allows for deeper insight into the social, political, economic, architectural and artistic history of classical antiquity. Partial and full scholarships are available. Come to the information session to learn more from the Faculty Director and past participants!

Date: Tuesday, February 17th
Time: 5:30-6:30 p.m.
Place: 612 Schermerhorn

Interested but can’t attend? Visit: http://columbia.studioabroad.com/?go=HadriansVilla

APAHA is a program created under the joint aegis of Columbia’s Italian Academy for Advanced Studies in America and H2CU, the Honors Center of Italian Universities of the Sapienza University in Rome. It is promoted by the Department of Art History and Archaeology, the Department of History, and the Classical Studies Graduate Program. It is directed by Professor Francesco de Angelis (Art History and Archaeology) and Professor Marco Maiuro (History).