Info Session – Columbia Summer Program: Hadrian’s Villa, The Archaeology of an Imperial Court

Info Session – Columbia Summer Program: Hadrian’s Villa, The Archaeology of an Imperial Court

Columbia’s Advanced Program of Ancient History and Art (APAHA) offers a four-week summer program that provides undergraduate and graduate students with the unique opportunity to excavate and learn together at Hadrian’s Villa, a UNESCO World Heritage site near Rome and the most important of Roman imperial villas. Students will learn archaeological techniques at all levels and think critically about how excavation work allows for deeper insight into the social, political, economic, architectural and artistic history of classical antiquity. Partial and full scholarships are available.  Come to the information session to learn more from the Faculty Directors and past participants!

Date: Tuesday, February 17th
Time: 5:30-6:30 p.m.
Place: 612 Schermerhorn

Interested but can’t attend? Visit: http://columbia.studioabroad.com/?go=HadriansVilla

APAHA is a program created under the joint aegis of Columbia’s Italian Academy for Advanced Studies in America and H2CU, the Honors Center of Italian Universities of the Sapienza University in Rome. It is promoted by the Department of Art History and Archaeology, the Department of History, and the Classical Studies Graduate Program. It is directed by Professor Francesco de Angelis (Art History and Archaeology) and Professor Marco Maiuro (History)

Hadrian’s Villa, The Archaeology of an Imperial Court

Information Session – Columbia Summer Program: Hadrian’s Villa, The Archaeology of an Imperial Court

Columbia’s Advanced Program of Ancient History and Art (APAHA) offers a four-week summer program that provides undergraduate and graduate students with the unique opportunity to excavate and learn together at Hadrian’s Villa, a UNESCO World Heritage site near Rome and the most important of Roman imperial villas. Students will learn archaeological techniques at all levels and think critically about how excavation work allows for deeper insight into the social, political, economic, architectural and artistic history of classical antiquity. Partial and full scholarships are available.  Below are two opportunities to learn more about this amazing program!

 

Information Session with Faculty Directors and Past Participants

Date: Thursday, November 20th

Time: 3-4:30 p.m.

Place: The Italian Academy,  3rd floor (1161 Amsterdam Avenue, between 116th and 118th Streets)

Columbia’s First Season at Hadrian’s Villa (2014): A Preliminary Report

Date: Friday, November 21st

Time: 11:00 a.m.

Place: The Italian Academy, 5th Floor (1161 Amsterdam Avenue, between 116th and 118th Streets)

Interested but can’t attend? Visit: http://columbia.studioabroad.com/?go=HadriansVilla

APAHA is a program created under the joint aegis of Columbia’s Italian Academy for Advanced Studies in America and H2CU, the Honors Center of Italian Universities of the Sapienza University in Rome. It is promoted by the Department of Art History and Archaeology, the Department of History, and the Classical Studies Graduate Program. It is directed by Professor Francesco de Angelis (Art History and Archaeology) and Professor Marco Maiuro (History).

Petition for Columbia University to Acknowledge the Lenape Territory

https://www.change.org/petitions/columbia-university-acknowledge-lenape-territory

Go to the link above to sign a petition to support Columbia University’s acknowledgement of the Lenni Lenape people.

 

“For Alma Mater on the Hudson Shore,” we ask Columbia University to fund a plaque on the Morningside Heights campus acknowledging the Lenni Lenape people to whom we owe a debt by virtue of our sitting, standing, and learning on lands that were originally theirs.

Founded in 1754 as King’s College by Royal Charter of George II, Columbia University in the City of New York has had a rich and prosperous history as one of the oldest and most illustrious institutions of higher learning in America.

Through the Core Curriculum and with a stated commitment “to advance knowledge and learning at the highest level and to convey the products of its efforts to the world,” Columbia stands at the forefront of globally conscious and civically responsible education. Columbia demands that its students, faculty, and administration reflect upon and improve their world.

However, it is our contention that with respect to its own history, the University has done so incompletely. This campus has many statues, monuments, and plaques celebrating a colonial heritage and legacy but neglects to mention the first inhabitants of this land.

Using the name “Columbia” and King’s Crown imagery, the University already implicitly acknowledges the fact that the school has prospered because of a colonial legacy that entailed the persecution and removal of the original owners of this land—the Lenni Lenape people. The Lenape were the victims of disease, warfare, dishonest agreements, and destructive policies. They now mostly live on reservations in Ontario, Wisconsin, and Oklahoma, vast distances away from their homeland.

In light of this history and in keeping with the University’s commitment “to advance knowledge,” we believe our alma mater has a responsibility to acknowledge its debt to the Lenni Lenape people.